The Eco Preservation Society isn't forcing one to take extreme steps, but rather encouraging each of us to take a minumum of one eco friendly step toward becoming more sustainable. If most of us take one step then as a complete, we could make a substantial difference.
Let's Save the World
The Eco Preservation Society isn't forcing one to take extreme steps, but rather encouraging each of us to take a minumum of one eco friendly step toward becoming more sustainable. If most of us take one step then as a complete, we could make a substantial difference.
The Eco Preservation Society is a membership, educational and networking organization specializing in the promotion of sustainable human action focused on achieving positive environmental effects. Our job is to market study, travel and instruction applications that advance environmental awareness and facilitate public consciousness with a call to action.
Mission Statement
The Eco Preservation Society is a membership, educational and networking organization specializing in the promotion of sustainable human action focused on achieving positive environmental effects. Our job is to market study, travel and instruction applications that advance environmental awareness and facilitate public consciousness with a call to action.

Carbon Offsets for Flying – Good or Bad?

Flying is not eco-friendly. But are carbon offsets really the answer? EcoExpert investigates.

The post Carbon Offsets for Flying – Good or Bad? appeared first on EcoFriendlyLink - The EcoExpert Blog.


Flying is not eco-friendly. But are carbon offsets really the answer? EcoExpert investigates.

The post Carbon Offsets for Flying – Good or Bad? appeared first on EcoFriendlyLink - The EcoExpert Blog.

stop flying it is not green, doesn't help to lower your carbon emissions

Can Carbon Offsets Help Your Carbon Footprint?

 

carbon offsets flying is not green

Flying is not the most eco-friendly way of travelling.  “Flight shaming” is making people more aware of alternatives such as trains (much more comfortable – and interesting – in my opinion). 

This has made a difference – however, on average, flights are increasing globally, spurred by budget holidays in foreign countries.

But sometimes you need to fly. Many people want to reduce their carbon footprint by doing something which will effectively make their trip carbon-neutral.  An easy way to do this is to carbon-offset your trip.

Lots of companies sprang up to offer this service.   But are they really helping?

What’s wrong with flying?

Airlines are keen to publicise that planes account for only 2 percent of global carbon emissions.  That doesn’t seem like a lot.

And sometimes, there aren’t alternatives to flying, especially long-distance.  And for people like me with a vast expanse of ocean between us and the nearest land, our choices are restricted to the occasional cruise ship, flying, or staying on the island.  

However, planes are worse than most other forms of transport in terms of the impact of greenhouse gases per passenger mile.  Plus, the processing and transportation of the aviation fuel, and the manufacture and maintenance of planes, airports and support vehicles all create extra carbon dioxide.   The real percentage, therefore, is much higher – and generated by a relatively small percentage of the global population who fly regularly

That’s why carbon offsets are so popular for flying.

Can planes get greener?

That seems fairly unlikely.  Newer planes are more fuel-efficient than older models, but it still takes a huge amount of fuel to get a plane off the ground, so even if biofuels could be used, vast areas of land would be needed to produce it.    Electricity is currently not powerful enough to fuel take-off for commercial jets – although small solar-powered planes will become more common. 

carbon offsets Flying coach classBudget airlines pack more passengers on each flight and typically have younger, more fuel-efficient fleets than longer-established airlines.  However, the budget airlines have contributed significantly to the increase in the number of people flying as well as their frequency.  (Cheap flights have encouraged more people to take mini-breaks abroad, sometimes more than one a year).

Business-class and first-class seats take up more space on the plane, thereby reducing the number of people who can fit on each flight, and thus creating more emissions per passenger.

OK, So What Are Carbon Offsets?

Call it penance:  a number of travel web sites and non-profit groups sell carbon offsets designed to compensate for travel-generated emissions by reducing levels of greenhouse gases in some unrelated way.

Here’s how it works: You go to one of several carbon offsets sites on the internet and use an online “carbon calculator” to determine the approximate amount of carbon dioxide produced when you drive, fly or otherwise burn fossil fuels.  Then you buy carbon offsets by donating money for projects that promise to either produce energy without burning fossil fuels or to reduce greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.   Typically the price is anywhere from $5 to $50, depending on the length of the trip and the form of transportation.

That money then goes towards projects such as planting trees on protected land, creating renewable energy in developing countries, or replacing diesel with solar power to heat water in schools.

But are carbon offsets all good?  Find out in my next article – it’s interesting!

Did you know?  One long-haul return flight (Los Angeles to London) can produce more carbon dioxide per passenger than the average U.K. motorist on one year*

Next: What are Carbon Offsets, are they Good or Bad?

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*  Netherlands Centre for Energy Conservation and Environmental Technology / DETR

Editor’s Note This article has been updated with new information since it was originally published.

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