The Eco Preservation Society isn't forcing one to take extreme steps, but rather encouraging each of us to take a minumum of one eco friendly step toward becoming more sustainable. If most of us take one step then as a complete, we could make a substantial difference.
Let's Save the World
The Eco Preservation Society isn't forcing one to take extreme steps, but rather encouraging each of us to take a minumum of one eco friendly step toward becoming more sustainable. If most of us take one step then as a complete, we could make a substantial difference.
The Eco Preservation Society is a membership, educational and networking organization specializing in the promotion of sustainable human action focused on achieving positive environmental effects. Our job is to market study, travel and instruction applications that advance environmental awareness and facilitate public consciousness with a call to action.
Mission Statement
The Eco Preservation Society is a membership, educational and networking organization specializing in the promotion of sustainable human action focused on achieving positive environmental effects. Our job is to market study, travel and instruction applications that advance environmental awareness and facilitate public consciousness with a call to action.

Disposable or Rechargeable Batteries?

Disposable batteries? Rechargeable batteries? Which is better? The answer may surprise you - and not many people know it!

The post Disposable or Rechargeable Batteries? appeared first on EcoFriendlyLink - Naturally Healthy Green Living.


Disposable batteries? Rechargeable batteries? Which is better? The answer may surprise you - and not many people know it!

The post Disposable or Rechargeable Batteries? appeared first on EcoFriendlyLink - Naturally Healthy Green Living.

Which Batteries are Better – Disposable or Rechargeable Batteries?

 

which batteriesA lot of people ask me about batteries, particularly about rechargeable batteries. These are the questions I get most often:

  • Why should I invest in rechargeable batteries?
  • Are rechargeable batteries really more green and eco-friendly?
  • Isn’t it a hassle, re-charging them all the time?

Well, I’m going to tell you something that a LOT of people don’t know!

You need both types!

What

EcoExpert is recommending something disposable?

In this case, yes, absolutely! Here’s the deal:

  • Disposable batteries are good for items that have a  low power draw, such as some wall clocks, cameras and emergency flashlights or torches. Plus, many smoke alarms or smoke detectors advise you to use disposables – always check the manufacturers’ recommendations.
  • Use rechargeable batteries for everything else – cameras, games consoles, etc.

Why not rechargeable batteries for everything – they’re more eco-friendly, aren’t they?

Yes they are, but rechargeable batteries are NOT as good for devices which drain energy at a slow, steady rate, even though the technology has improved.

Disposables will hold a charge for years when not in use, so they’re the better choice for items that may sit unused for long periods of time.

However, rechargeable batteries are better for almost everything else – they’ll save you money, and they’re much better for the environment.

In fact, rechargeable AA and AAA batteries almost always last longer, cost less, and reduce waste compared with single-use batteries.

Rechargeables are less likely to leak than disposables, so you’re less likely to see that nasty corrosion in your gadgets.

There’s no “memory effect” so you can recharge them whenever you want (you don’t have to wait till they’re fully wound down).

But recharging batteries is a hassle!

Let me ask you something.  You re-charge your cell phone battery without a murmur, don’t you? 🙂

The amount of money you’re saving with rechargeable batteries, as well as the benefits to the environment, make it easy to justify rechargeables.

 Green Tip: Keep a few sets of rechargeable batteries always charged so that you are never without batteries when you need them. When one set dies, place them in a charger before you go to bed and they should be full of power and ready to go by the morning.

Why are rechargeable batteries more eco-friendly, anyway?

batteriesEven though newer disposable batteries have less hazardous material in them than older batteries, they still end up in landfills in large quantities (unless they’re recycled – and very few are). In landfills they release heavy metals, corrosive materials and other toxic chemicals into the soil.

Rechargeables have 28 times less impact on global warming, 30 times less impact on air pollution, 9 times less impact on air acidification, and 12 times less impact on water pollution!

 Related: How to recycle your batteries

Rechargeable batteries are used again and again (hundreds of times), and so there’s less going to landfill.

By re-using batteries, you’re not mining virgin resources for new disposables.

And you reduce the environmental impact of transporting large volumes of disposable batteries around the world.

Even after including the cost of a charger, rechargeable batteries will pay for themselves in five to six recharge cycles, compared with buying most brand-name disposables.

And still on the subject of cost, according to market research firm Statista, based on battery usage in the US, you’d need to buy only 1 rechargeable battery for every 10 disposables you’d use.

Which Are The Best Rechargeable Batteries?

Most rechargeable batteries are pretty equal in terms of performance. However, my recommendation is Panasonic’s Eneloop batteries. Why? Because they are charged in the factory with solar power – that’s very green and ecofriendly! Plus, they conform to the Green Certificate System.

And they’re said to work in cold climates, which many other batteries don’t. (Many years ago, I had to keep batteries with me in my sleeping bag when I travelled to the Arctic, to avoid them freezing).

And of course, like most other good brands, Eneloop batteries are pre-charged, so they’re ready-to-use right away.

Panasonic eneloop rechargeable batteries
Click the picture for more details

 

Which Charger is best?

There are loads of battery chargers available.  Be sure to buy a good one – a bad one will shorten the life of your rechargeable batteries by charging too quickly and heating the batteries.  Heated batteries are damaged batteries. (Eneloop batteries charge well in Eneloop chargers – click here for more details).

Look for chargers which properly monitor and control the charging process, and also try to get one which shuts off once charging is complete.

Always remove your batteries from the charger after charging.

Keep several spare batteries available at all times, so you can swap them out when needed.

Which Type of Rechargeable Battery is best?

There are 4 main types of rechargeables.

  1. Don’t buy NiCad batteries – they contain a lot of toxic chemicals and metals and they don’t compete on performance with the other options.
  2. Generally speaking, NiMH AA rechargeable with 2000 (or higher) cycle is the best all-round choice (800 for AAA batteries). They offer good performance and are toxic-metal-free.
  3. You can buy rechargeable alkaline batteries, but although they are low in cost, their performance in tests is relatively poor, so stick with NiMH.
  4. Lithium Ion batteries offer excellent performance, and can go unused for long periods without losing their charge.  But they are relatively expensive.  Use them for rarely-used or high-drain laptops, digital cameras, cell phones and portable televisions.

 

Summary

Use rechargeable batteries wherever possible (NiMH or Lithium). They save you money, and they’re miles better for the environment. Some devices unfortunately still need disposables – check the manufacturer’s recommendations.

 

Next:  How can I easily Recycle my old Batteries?

Was this article useful? Please Share it with your friends (buttons below) – thank you!

Warm regards,

signature Clare

The post Disposable or Rechargeable Batteries? appeared first on EcoFriendlyLink - Naturally Healthy Green Living.


Read full article on Eco life