The Eco Preservation Society isn't forcing one to take extreme steps, but rather encouraging each of us to take a minumum of one eco friendly step toward becoming more sustainable. If most of us take one step then as a complete, we could make a substantial difference.
Let's Save the World
The Eco Preservation Society isn't forcing one to take extreme steps, but rather encouraging each of us to take a minumum of one eco friendly step toward becoming more sustainable. If most of us take one step then as a complete, we could make a substantial difference.
The Eco Preservation Society is a membership, educational and networking organization specializing in the promotion of sustainable human action focused on achieving positive environmental effects. Our job is to market study, travel and instruction applications that advance environmental awareness and facilitate public consciousness with a call to action.
Mission Statement
The Eco Preservation Society is a membership, educational and networking organization specializing in the promotion of sustainable human action focused on achieving positive environmental effects. Our job is to market study, travel and instruction applications that advance environmental awareness and facilitate public consciousness with a call to action.

Spotted-tailed quoll project update ‒ July 2019

Find out what the Quoll Seekers team has been up to and meet wildlife detection dog team, Carnarvon Canines.

Find out what the Quoll Seekers team has been up to and meet wildlife detection dog team, Carnarvon Canines.

7 July 2019

 

Image: Jessica McClure. Jerry’s Downfall Reserve (Park Ridge South).

This project is funded through a Logan City Council Envirogrant

The spotted-tailed quoll (Dasyurus maculatus maculatus) is listed as Endangered under Commonwealth legislation, Vulnerable in Queensland (southern sub-species) and as one of Logan City Council’s Threatened Wildlife.

Through its dedicated Quoll Seekers Network (QSN), Wildlife Queensland (WPSQ) has used infra-red wildlife cameras to monitor for this endangered species in Logan for the past five years.

Throughout this period, WPSQ and the QSN have responded to public sightings of spotted-tailed quoll surveying over 70 locations in the Logan City Council region.

Though a wide range of wildlife was detected, the network did not capture any photographic evidence of a population of spotted-tailed quolls. The most recent ‘hard-evidence’ of spotted-tailed quoll collected in the Logan Council region was in the form of an individual animal killed on Johnson Rd at Greenbank in 2007.

Wildlife detection dogs

Image: Matt Cecil. Detection dog team, Carnarvon Canines (Sparky and Lilly with Ecologist & Wildlife Detection Dog Specialist, Amanda Hancock).

QSN has investigated the use of wildlife detection dogs as a survey method to compliment the infra-red cameras. Detection dogs have been shown to provide reliable indications for the presence of a target odour, and their use in locating cryptic Australian native wildlife is rapidly gaining momentum.

QSN believes the use of quoll-specific detection dogs will allow us to obtain information on the presence or absence of quolls in the Logan area when responding to time-specific public sightings reports.

These highly trained odour detection dogs are trained to locate evidence such as target species’ scat which if located definitively indicate that quolls inhabit an area.

Spring Mountain Forest Park survey

The Quoll Seekers team undertook a survey within Spring Mountain Forest Park, Flesser Reserve and Jerry’s Downfall Reserve (Park Ridge South) on Tuesday, 25 June, before wet weather forced the survey to finish prematurely.

Accompanying us was detection dog team, Carnarvon Canines from Wompoo Farm Pty Ltd.

Once a suitable weather window is found, the team will be out with Carnarvon Canines to survey again. So, stay tuned for updates!

 

The team did manage to disrupt a mammoth carpet python basking in the sun rays. A close encounter for everyone was assured with the cold reptile caught at its mid-winter slowest.

View more images below (click on images to enlarge).

Image: Matt Cecil. A mammoth carpet python basking in the sun, Spring Mountain Forest Park.

Image: Matt Cecil. Carpet python at Spring Mountain Forest Park.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image: Jessica McClure. A stunning rainbow before the wet hit.

Image: Jessica McClure. Detection dog team, Carnarvon Canines (Sparky and Lilly with Ecologist & Wildlife Detection Dog Specialist, Amanda Hancock).

Image: Matt Cecil. Spring Mountain Forest Park.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image: Matt Cecil. Detection dog team, Carnarvon Canines (Sparky and Lilly with Ecologist & Wildlife Detection Dog Specialist, Amanda Hancock).

Image: Stan Earnshaw. Spring Mountain Forest Park.

Image: Matt Cecil. Carpet python at Spring Mountain Forest Park.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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