The Eco Preservation Society isn't forcing one to take extreme steps, but rather encouraging each of us to take a minumum of one eco friendly step toward becoming more sustainable. If most of us take one step then as a complete, we could make a substantial difference.
Let's Save the World
The Eco Preservation Society isn't forcing one to take extreme steps, but rather encouraging each of us to take a minumum of one eco friendly step toward becoming more sustainable. If most of us take one step then as a complete, we could make a substantial difference.
The Eco Preservation Society is a membership, educational and networking organization specializing in the promotion of sustainable human action focused on achieving positive environmental effects. Our job is to market study, travel and instruction applications that advance environmental awareness and facilitate public consciousness with a call to action.
Mission Statement
The Eco Preservation Society is a membership, educational and networking organization specializing in the promotion of sustainable human action focused on achieving positive environmental effects. Our job is to market study, travel and instruction applications that advance environmental awareness and facilitate public consciousness with a call to action.

Evidence of elusive spotted-tailed quoll discovered in Logan 

Results from a recent survey conducted by Wildlife Queensland’s Quoll Seekers Network (QSN) under an environmental grant from Logan City Council show positive indications of spotted-tailed quolls in the Logan City Council local government area.

The post Evidence of elusive spotted-tailed quoll discovered in Logan  appeared first on Wildlife Preservation Society Queensland.


Results from a recent survey conducted by Wildlife Queensland’s Quoll Seekers Network (QSN) under an environmental grant from Logan City Council show positive indications of spotted-tailed quolls in the Logan City Council local government area.

The post Evidence of elusive spotted-tailed quoll discovered in Logan  appeared first on Wildlife Preservation Society Queensland.

Press Release

6 March 2020

 

A project conducted by Wildlife Queensland’s Quoll Seekers Network together with Logan City Council has had success in detecting evidence to suggest the presence of spotted-tailed quolls in the Logan City Council local government area.

Quoll Dog Detection Team

Quoll detection dogs, Sparky and Lily (part of the Carnarvon Canines team), sniffing out quoll in Logan. Image © Amanda Hancock

Brisbane, QLD, 6 March 2020: Results from a recent survey conducted by Wildlife Queensland’s Quoll Seekers Network (QSN) under an environmental grant from Logan City Council show positive indications of spotted-tailed quolls in bushland at the Flinders Peak end of the Flinders Peak to Karawatha Corridor in Logan City, South East Queensland.

QSN surveyed a total of eight sites containing quoll habitat in late June and mid-July 2019 within the Logan City Council Region utilising quoll odour detection dogs.

Positive indications for the presence of quoll odour were recorded at three of the eight properties surveyed: Mt Perry, Mt Elliott and private property which neighbours Mt Elliott.

Droppings presumed to belong to a spotted-tailed quoll were identified on a rock ledge along a creek line at one site during the detection dog survey at Mt Perry. The droppings, located by the detection dogs, were analysed by one of Australia’s foremost authorities on animal hair and scats who believed they were quoll droppings but couldn’t be categorical about the identity because no quoll hair could be found in the droppings. The many hairs in the droppings belonged to dunnarts and possums.

The opinions of the expert and the detection dogs make a very compelling case for the presence of quolls in the Logan City Council local government area.

“Quoll Seekers Network and Wildlife Queensland have searched long and hard for positive signs that this carnivorous marsupial still lives in the Logan area. These results provide some reward for that hard work. However, we are very concerned that the rapid urban expansion planned for the Ripley Valley and the Undullah master-planned community would compromise the chance of spotted-tailed quolls persisting in the area,” says Wildlife Queensland Projects Manager Matt Cecil.

Carnarvon Canines

Quoll detection dog Lily and Ecologist Amanda Hancock (of Carnarvon Canines) searching a large rocky outcrop for spotted-tailed quoll at Mt Perry, Logan surveys 2019. Image © Ebony Reeves

The spotted-tailed quoll (Dasyurus maculatus maculatus) is listed as Endangered under Commonwealth legislation, Vulnerable under Queensland legislation and as one of Logan City Council’s Threatened Wildlife.

The last hard evidence of the species inhabiting the Logan region was a deceased juvenile male quoll found on Johnson Road at Forest Lake in 2007.

Detection dogs have been shown to provide reliable indications for the presence of a target odour, and their use in locating cryptic Australian native wildlife is rapidly gaining momentum.

“The use of scent detection dogs trained to sniff-out spotted-tailed quoll droppings is a key aspect of the project and may be the missing element in our so-far-unsuccessful search for the species in this region.

“The project has provided the best evidence since 2007 that spotted-tailed quolls still inhabit the Logan region. We hope this evidence will support further quoll-seeking activities and help raise awareness of the plight of quolls in Queensland,” says Cecil.

QSN plans to re-survey in the same locations during May 2020 to search for more evidence of this threatened species.

Community members can help by joining the Quoll Seekers Network and reporting quoll sightings.

Contact: 
Matt Cecil, Projects Manager
Ph: 07 3844 0129

The post Evidence of elusive spotted-tailed quoll discovered in Logan  appeared first on Wildlife Preservation Society Queensland.


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